Details

Details

Prior to the mid-nineteenth century, craftsmen were compelled to apply ornamentation to their furniture to cover the structural elements. The fathers of the Arts and Crafts movement, however, insisted that the elements of a structure ought to be celebrated.

The structural elements of the designs in this catalog are often exposed and reveal a reverence for detail and simplicity. Looking at an exposed dovetail joint or a tenon that comes through a chair leg inspires confidence and an appreciation of things well tended. We can see very clearly how the parts of a chair or drawer fit together, and that simplicity is innocent and inviting.

At the same time, to see and touch these things after they have been so carefully sculpted, finely polished, and clearly finished is to share in the diligence that went into them. The details are at once simple and complex.

The philosophy for detail in my work draws from the heritage of the movement’s founders. I expose the joinery whenever it seems fitting to the structural integrity and overall aesthetic. Wedged through tenons, exposed dovetailed drawers, sculpted pins and buttons, and polished splines all bear witness to a love for the structure and an appreciation
for detail.